Weather Data

Perhaps the largest influence on your home’s energy use is the weather. When it’s cold in the winter and your heating system runs, or when it’s hot in the summer and your air conditioning runs, your bill will typically be higher. How much weather affects your electric bills depends on many factors, including your home’s original construction materials, insulation and air leaks. Personal comfort plays a role too, as does the difference between the thermostat setting inside and temperatures outdoors.

What are Heating and Cooling Degree Days?

Heating Degree Days and Cooling Degree Days are measurements of how mild, normal or extreme temperatures are over a period of time. These measurements affect your household energy consumption and ultimately, your electric bills. If the outside temperature is 65 degrees or lower, you'll need to use heat to maintain a 70 degree temperature inside. If the outside temperature is 65 degrees or higher, you'll need to use air conditioning to maintain a 70 degree temperature inside.

How is this data computed?

It is calculated based on an average daily temperature of 65 degrees. If the average temperature is higher than 65 degrees, it is considered a cooling degree day, meaning that you will have to use your air conditioner to maintain a 70 degree temperature inside. If the average temperature is below 65 degrees, it is considered a heating degree day, because you will have to use your heat to maintain a 70 degree temperature inside.

Click here for the Average Temperatures Chart

Click here for the Heating Degree Days Chart

Click here for the Cooling Degree Days Chart